Try Yokohama Chinatown Foods

Yokohama Chinatown is an area of Chinese shops and restaurants in Yokohama 's attractive old port area. Minato Mirai 21: Although wonderful in the day, this urban harborside area just outside Minato Mirai station really comes into its own at night with its dynamic view of skyscrapers and the symbols of Yokohama like the Landmark Tower, a 296-meter skyscraper filled with shops and dining, Queen's Square, the Nippon Maru Museum Ship, and the massive Ferris wheel Cosmo Clock 21 are all illuminated beautifully against the water.
Leave some space after dinner, for you must be sure to sample the deep-fried sweet dumplings, peach-shaped pork buns and steaming roasted chestnuts 中華街 焼き小籠包 and peanuts sold along any of the many streets in Yokohama Chinatown, washed down with iced sour lemonade sold by the plastic cup.

Although Sichuan cooking is usually known for its spiciness, Shinkinko offers something for every palate, with over 100 dishes on the menu, including items for those with slightly more mild sensibilities, as well as food that pairs perfectly with beer.
Not just a place for buying great souvenirs and eat Chinese food, the area has grown so much in space and variety that you'll find traditional foods from all over Asia here, including Korean Barbecue, Vietnamese pho and banh mi, and Taiwanese dumplings.
Once you're on your way into Yokohama, and you want to head into Minatomirai, Yamashita Park and Chinatown, you need to change to Minatomirai Line at Yokohama Station, which will take you to Motomachi-Chukagai Station right next to Chinatown and Yamashita Park.

The city is definitely a walkable one but those pressed for time may find it easier to resort to public transportation when getting around. There are several all-you-can-eat courses with up to 133 dishes in the restaurant, and the most popular of all is all-you-can-eat-buffet style.
You will leave Yokohama Chinatown with your ears ringing with bells, eyes burning with lights and stomach bursting with Chinese food. After a little break and satisfying your sweet-tooth, get back on the streets to check out one of Chinatown 's most famous and picture-worthy treats: the panda steam bun.

Much of this activity is clustered around Sakuragi-cho station, the terminus of the Toyoko Line from Shibuya in downtown Tokyo, and also a stop of the Japan Railway system. This area is now becoming less and less a residential neighborhood and more and more a tourist area full of shops and restaurants of Chinese cuisine.
They're a street food staple of Taiwanese night markets, and are a hearty and filling option, with just enough peppery heat to warm you up on a chilly winter day in Tokyo. In many cases, the dishes have been tweaked to cater to the Japanese palate, but not so much as you'll often find elsewhere in Japan.

When the First Sino-Japanese War erupted in 1894, many Chinese returned to their homeland. Its proximity to Tokyo and delicious food scene make it a great way to spend a day. The architecture found in each of these is incredible, and it's easy to see the vast difference between the Chinese and Japanese styles in every historical sight you come across.
We were treated to an unforgettable dining experience with uniformed waiters in white gloves serving all (veggie and seafood) dim sum I can imagine - but one dish was about the price of a typical All-You-Can-Eat Chinatown deal. It is tough to think of Chinese food when driving through Japan's ceaseless acres of tea bushes and rice paddies.
They say there are 500-600 food and drink establishments in Noge, including Japanese and Chinese joints, in addition to bars. Interest among Japanese people grew and led to an explosion in the number of visitors to Chinatown. But we recommend you to try one of the baked casserole-like rice dishes.

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